EcoPerspectives Blog

Campaign Finance: The Gateway Reform

By Russell King, 2L Staff Editor, Vermont Journal of Environmental Law     Readers of this blog likely consider themselves environmentalists and are seeking environmental reform. The issues are effectively limitless: from restoring superfund to keeping coal ash out of our streams, from removing the petroleum industry’s categorical exemptions from NEPA to actually getting legislation to… Read more »

Net Metering: Subsidy or Compensation?

By Russell King, 2L Staff Editor, Vermont Journal of Environmental Law     As mentioned in a previous post, anthropogenic climate change poses a grave threat to civilization. We can, and thus ought to, curb the effects by releasing less greenhouse gasses (GHGs). In America, energy policy provides one avenue towards this goal: electricity generation produces… Read more »

Rethinking Hydropower: Infrastructure Based Generation

By Russell King, 2L Staff Editor, Vermont Journal of Environmental Law             Anthropogenic climate change is one of the world’s most pressing concerns. Conservative estimates show a societal cost of carbon that rises to $95 per ton by 2050, culminating in a yearly loss of 23% of the world’s GPD by 2100. This figure only… Read more »

American cultural narratives of the Arctic could undergird climate change denial

Summary: Vachula examines how public images and discourse of the Arctic may affect climate change skepticism in a recently published article in Media, Culture & Society. __________________________________________ By Richard S. Vachula, Department of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. In American popular culture,… Read more »

Desalination and Alternative Water Supply and Efficiency

President John. F. Kennedy once said, “If we could produce freshwater from saltwater at a low cost, that would indeed be a great service to humanity, and would dwarf any other scientific accomplishment.” However hopeful President Kennedy’s words were, he was referring to basic groundwater desalination projects, and not the centralized, large-scale projects of seawater… Read more »

Food Deserts In Appalachia: A Socio-Economic Ill and Opportunities for Reform

Summary: This post originally appeared in the Oxford Human Rights Blog on November 15, 2016. Food deserts constitute a public health phenomenon in which communities lack sufficient access to nutritious whole foods. The U.S. Appalachian region currently faces a food desert crisis of problematic proportions: this crisis stems from neoliberalism’s dire legacy and a rapidly… Read more »

The Trump Watch: What Does the New Administration Portend for the Environment?

 Mark Latham and Rachel Oest The results are in. Following one of the most contentious presidential campaigns in our history, the people have spoken—or at least the Electoral College has spoken. Hillary Clinton may have won the popular vote by over two million votes, but she lost the election. Try explaining that to your new… Read more »

Is Avoiding Climate Change Causing a Market Bubble?

By Breanna Hayes When a person buys stock in a company, they are buying a share of that company’s assets. Therefore, if a company owns $30 million in assets and issues 5 million stock, each stock entitles its owner to $6 worth of equity. When stock is sold, however, the price is not necessarily its… Read more »

Reporting on COP: Just Peace through Climate Action

The following article is part of an Eco-Perspective special in which the Vermont Journal of Environmental Law is collaborating with the VLS COP22 Observer Delegation __________________________________________ By Jenny Leech This year, the COP demonstrated the priority of climate justice by recognizing the first official Climate Justice Day on the UNFCCC Programme. The celebration of Climate… Read more »

Reporting on COP: Are Human Rights Lost and Damaged?

The following article is part of an Eco-Perspective special in which the Vermont Journal of Environmental Law is collaborating with the VLS COP22 Observer Delegation __________________________________________ By Jonas Reagan Loss and Damage (L&D) includes the permanent loss of land, culture, and human life and will escalate existing tensions over increasingly scarce resources. This tension will… Read more »