EcoPerspectives Blog

Incentivizing Ecosystem Services: Agroecology as a Solution to Agricultural Nonpoint Source Water Pollution

by Lizzie Fainberg Common agricultural practices in the United States contribute a significant amount of pollution to the environment. Agriculture is a leading cause of water pollution in the United States. Large farm operations across the nation commonly use large amounts of fertilizer and pesticides to increase yield to the maximum extent possible. This pollution… Read more »

Considering Climate Risks and the Indus Waters Treaty in the 2019 India-Pakistan Showdown (Part 1)

By Nadia B. Ahmad In the early hours of February 26, 2019, Indian air forces crossed the Line of Control into Pakistan and conducted a series of coordinated air strikes against a “Jaish-e-Muhammad training camp” in the area, saying “a very large number of JeM terrorists, trainers, senior commanders and groups of jihadis who were… Read more »

How the Endangered Species Act is Helping to Restore the Klamath River Basin

By Dave Jennings The Klamath River Basin (KRB) covers an area of 15,700 square miles across California and Oregon in the Pacific Northwest. The KRB is recognized as having exceptionally high biodiversity, particularly for birds. Fish are another important ecological component of the KRB, with 83 fish species are found throughout. Historically, Native American tribes… Read more »

The Rights of Nature Movement: A Closer Look at New Zealand

New Zealand, North Island, Te Urewera National Park, Lake Waikaremoana and Panekire Range

By Addison Luck   The rights of nature movement, which involves giving legal personhood status to various environmental and geographic features and incorporating the rights of nature in local law, is a legal movement that is gaining popularity throughout the world. The idea was first introduced to the modern world by the American professor Christopher Stone… Read more »

Rights of Nature Takes Hold in Crestone, Colorado

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By Darlene Lee and Grant Wilson, Earth Law Center In advance of Vermont Law School’s October 19, 2018 Symposium on “Rights of Nature: Shifting Paradigms and Grounding in the Law,” case studies provide useful context for how the Rights of Nature movement is developing at the grassroots level. The case of Crestone, Colorado is a… Read more »

WHEN COURTS MEET NATURE: A REAL CASE ON RIGHTS OF NATURE

WHEN COURTS MEET NATURE A REAL CASE ON RIGHTS OF NATURE Hugo Echeverría – Environmental Lawyer* Ecuador A SUI GENERIS CASE Disponible en Español It took place in Ecuador between 2012 and 2015. It happened in a remote area, a frontier-area with many socio-environmental conflicts where law enforcement is challenging. There, a local Court addressed… Read more »

WHEN COURTS MEET NATURE: A REAL CASE ON RIGHTS OF NATURE

WHEN COURTS MEET NATURE A REAL CASE ON RIGHTS OF NATURE Hugo Echeverría – Environmental Lawyer* Ecuador UN CASO SUI GENERIS Available in English Ocurrió en Ecuador, entre 2012 y 2015. Ocurrió en una zona remota y fronteriza; una zona marcada por conflictos socioambientales, en la que la aplicación de la ley constituye un desafío… Read more »

Asbestos Use in the United States

By Anna Suarez, an environmental advocate focused on raising awareness about asbestos and public health. Summary: Asbestos use in the United States is not a topic at the forefront of the public’s focus, but one that still affects Americans today. By addressing the history of this mineral’s use we can better understand current conversations about… Read more »

It’s Time to Stop Kicking the Can and Ban Canned Hunting

By David Jennings, 1L Student, Vermont Law School Typically, canned hunting involves going to a game ranch or reserve, paying a fee, and hunting the animal(s) of your choice within the convenient confines of that ranch. South Africa is notorious for attracting foreigners to its canned hunts, but this practice is also fairly widespread in… Read more »

Climate Activists Argue Criminal Acts Legally Excusable Under Necessity Doctrine

By Dan Wilcox, Senior Notes Editor, Vermont Journal of Environmental Law Upcoming cases will provide U.S. justice system first glimpse of juries’ taste for climate action necessity On October 11, 2016, in an effort known as #ShutItDown, a group dubbed the “Valve Turners” traveled to five remote locations in North Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, and Washington,… Read more »